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Computer Studies Courses Offered

The following courses are offered within the Computer Studies Department: 

COMP 101 Personal Computing  (3 Credit Hours-Fall & Spring)

Personal Computing covers the fundamentals of computer hardware and software for beginning users. The purpose of this course is to give students without previous computer experience the knowledge and skills need to use computers effectively in college and beyond.

COMP 105 Exploring Gadgets (3 Credit Hours- Even Year Spring)

This course is aimed at students from all academic majors. No computer background is necessary and none is expected. Students will explore the usage of Raspberry Pi microcomputers and the Arduino microcontroller in controlling interactive gadgets. This course will introduce the student to the fundamentals of controlling real world objects with short, easy to understand computer programs. Elements of electronic design and computer programming will be introduced in the context of simple experiments that will progressively allow the student to become more sophisticated at computer control. Much of the work will consist of controlling lights, motors, and toy cars. Students will also explore time lapse photography, both visible and infrared while utilizing Raspberry Pi programming.

COMP 110 Computer Technology Essentials (3 Credit Hours-Summer)

This course will introduce the student to word processing utilizing Microsoft Word and presentations software utilizing Microsoft PowerPoint. Topics covered will include text enhancements, styles, tables, textboxes, graphics, newsletters, transitions, animations and research paper formatting. The impact of technology on society will be examined.

COMP 131 Foundations of Computer Systems (3 Credit-Fall& Spring)

This course covers the history and present status of computers, computing systems, and their applications. The concepts of algorithms, structured programming and event-driven programming for problem solving will be studied. The Visual BASIC programming language with the topics of variables, assignments, conditions, loops, graphical user interfaces, controls, and processing scripts are covered.

COMP 141 Hardware Organization (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

Hardware Organization covers the fundamentals of computer hardware and software as well as advanced concepts. Students who complete this course will be able to describe the internal components of a computer, assemble a computer system, install an operating system, and troubleshoot using system tools and diagnostic software. Students will also be able to connect to the internet and share resources in a network environment. Additional topics included are laptops, portable devices, wireless connectivity, security, safety, environmental issues, and communication skills.  

COMP 150 Applications: These courses cover the capabilities of modern microcomputers and their place in today’s society. Each individual course will study a software application and its capabilities.

            150C: Excel  (2 Credit Hours-Fall & Spring )

            The course provides a study of the capabilities of microcomputers. The study of electronic spreadsheets and their capabilities will be demonstrated through the            utilization of the Excel software application.

            150D: Access (2 Credit -On Demand)

            The course provides a study of the capabilities of microcomputers. The study of database managers and their capabilities will be demonstrated through the utilization of the Access software application.

            150G: Mathematica (2 Credit Hours-On Demand)

            This course utilizes the program Mathematica as a symbolic manipulator and problem solving tool for mathematical and scientific computing.

            150H: Word (2 Credits-Fall & Spring)

            This course will introduce the student to word processing utilizing Microsoft Word. Topics covered will include text enhancements, styles, tables, text boxes,         graphics and other inserted objects. Students will learn the basics of newsletter and research paper formatting. The impact of technology on society will be examined.

            150I: PowerPoint (2 Credit Hours-Fall & Spring)

            The course provides a study of the capabilities of microcomputers. The study of presentation software and their capabilities will be demonstrated through the           utilization of the PowerPoint software application

COMP 165 Operating Systems (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

In this course, students will develop skills in the management of a desktop client operating system, including how to install and configure network clients; setup users, groups, policies, and profiles; configure hardware components and applications; setup and maintain a logon security and security for files and printers; and configure and optimize clients in multiple environments.

COMP 160  3D Design, Digitizing, and Printing (3 Credit Hours- Fall)

Current Developments and utilizations of 3D Design, Digitizing, and Printing will be explored. Parametric modeling software will be utilized to design original work. Additive manufacturing, different printing materials, and various 3D printer models will be studied.

COMP 200  Information Management & Data Analysis (3 Credit Hours-Fall & Spring)

This course will introduce the students to the fundamentals of data management, utilizing Microsoft Excel and Access, with a brief introduction to statistical packages. Students will learn the fundamentals of data analysis utilizing each package, and will see how data can be further comprehended by linking between the packages. The process of converting data into information will be stressed throughout the course. Experience with Excel is expected.

COMP 210*  Digital Masks (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

In today’s society, a great amount of time is spent in the form of digital expression. A person will work on emails, live physical lives virtually on social media, and communicate through physical and digital means. How does this interaction of both real and virtual representation mold physical human beings? This course exposes students to popular social media formats and helps them understand the promises and challenges that social media has brought to each individual’s life. To understand how a person lives physically and digitally impacts how a person will work, live, and play each day. This course will help students successfully represent themselves in both areas as well as look at what values and ethics are important to each student and how that impacts people that a student might see physically, but also those individuals we might see or only communicate with digitally. Prerequisite: ENGL120.

COMP 225  Java Programming (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Fall)

This introductory course in object oriented programming explores the Java Programming language and covers basic problem solving and programming fundamentals. The course is practical, with many examples and programming exercises. Students taking this course will receive a solid basis in the Java programming language upon which to base continued training and career development.

COMP 231  Advanced Programming with Visual Basic (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

The concepts of structured programming and event-driven programming for problem solving will be studied and utilized. The Visual BASIC programming language with the topics of conditions, loops, graphical user interfaces, controls, processing scripts, database management systems, arrays, object classes, subroutines and programmer defined functions are covered. Prerequisite: COMP 131

COMP 235  Python Programming (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

This course will cover the basics of programming with Python. The student will learn about expressions, variables, conditionals, loops, lists, sets, dicts, functions, objects, and exceptions. Students will build and debug entire programs which demonstrate high level programming competencies. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to store and manipulate user-input data using Python, implement basic Python decisions, and understand iteration, sequence containers, sets, and dicts. Students will read and write files using Python, define custom functions and call built-in Python functions, as well as importing modules and namespaces from the python Standard Library. Students will also define classes and instantiate objects using Python’s Class mechanism, handle exceptions and document code and build and debug entire programs written in Python.

COMP 240  Introduction to Linux (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Fall)

This course is intended for students who want to learn about the Linux operating system. It does not assume any prior knowledge of Linux and is geared toward those interested in systems administration as well as those who will use or develop programs for Linux systems. The course provides comprehensive coverage of topics related to Linux certifications, including Linux distributions, installation, administration, X-Windows, networking, and security. Upon completion of this course you should have a good working knowledge of Linux from both a graphical and command line perspective.

COMP 260 /PHYS 260  Circuit Analysis & Electronics (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Spring)

Circuit Analysis & Electronics covers the analysis of DC circuits containing resistors and capacitors. Analog and digital electronics are studied including diodes, transistors, flip-flops, gates, counters, and integrated circuits. AC circuits and inductors will also be covered. Students will learn to interface microcontrollers to control electrical circuits.

COMP 270  Web Page Programming I (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

This course is an introduction to web page design concepts and provides a study of the principles of the HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and JavaScript. The utilization of the Internet for business, education, and entertainment purposes will be analyzed.

COMP 286  Special Topics (Variable Credit-On Demand)

A focused investigation into a selected area(s) of Computer Studies that will include topics of current issues in computer studies and related fields at the lower division level.

COMP 290  Independent Study (Variable Credit-On Demand)

Independent Study consists of research, readings, or other scholarly investigation or creative work at the lower division level. See Independent Study under Alternative Means to Academic Credit for a more detailed description.

COMP 305  Foundations of Computer Forensics (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Fall)

This course will provide a foundation in the field of Computer Forensics. The student will learn the recovery and analysis of digital evidence in civil, criminal, or administrative cases. Forensic examination techniques of Windows and Linux systems are used to illustrate typical investigative processes. Prerequisite: COMP 141, COMP 164, and COMP 235.

COMP 310  Robotics Programming (3 Cr Hrs-Even Year Fall)

This course will integrate advanced concepts of programming and mobile robots. The concepts of robotic sensors, emitters, detectors, lights, sounds and motors will be researched and utilized. Programming for robotics will include GUII programming, the Spin programming Language and other Languages. Prerequisite: A programming course of programming experience.

COMP 322/ MATH 322 Numerical Methods (3 Credit Hours-On Demand)

Analyzing tabulated data, error analysis, solving linear systems of equations, numerical integration, solution of partial differential equations and finite difference methods are components of this course. Prerequisite: COMP 131, MATH 225, and MATH 245.

COMP 325 Advanced Java Programming (3 Credit Hours-Even Year Spring)

This course is a study of advanced topics in the Java programming language by building on a basic knowledge of the Java language. Topics covered will include multi-threading, Swing classes, the Swing events models, advanced layout managers, and the JavaBeans component model.

COMP 330  Visual Basic Application (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Fall)

This course will integrate the advanced concepts of programming and the Microsoft Office applications. The course involves writing programs in the Visual Basic language that automates tasks in Microsoft Office applications, in particular Microsoft Excel. Prerequisite: COMP 231.

COMP 331 C++ Programming (3 Credit Hours-Even Year Fall)

This course will introduce the student to the C++ programming language. Topics covered will emphasize structured programming techniques and top down design. Topics will include Data Types, String Operations, Loops, I/O, File Operations, Conditions and Logical Control Structures, Data Streams, Function Calls, Value and Reference Parameters, Functional Decomposition, Scope, Lifetime, Arrays, Data Typos, Lists and Strings,. And Records. Students will be introduced to abstract data types and class structures. Prerequisites: COMP 131 or COMP 235.

COMP 340  Linux II (3 Credit Hours-Even Year Spring)

Building on the concepts from Linux I, this course develops deeper understanding into Linux administration. Students will look at advanced topics in Linux. Students will also work with different Linux distributions. This course builds understanding and leads student to be able to manage enterprise Linux solutions. Prerequisite: COMP 240.

COMP 341 Scientific Programming (3 Credit Hours-Even Year Spring)

This course will introduce the student to two high level packages that are fundamental to the processes of scientific programming, Matlab and LabVIEW. Matlab is a general high-level computer language that is useful for solving a wide variety of problems in science and engineering. This course aims to provide a basic understanding of the language for student who already have some programming experience. There will be an emphasis on the features that distinguish Matlab from other languages, in particular, Matlab’s matrix and vector operations, complex mathematical functions, as well as plotting and visualization tools. The national instruments software package LabVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench) which enables measurement, process control and the acquisition, analysis, display, and storage of data. In data operations, actual sensors will feed information to virtual (created in software) instruments.

COMP 345* Global Aspects of Technology (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

The course will provide an analysis of the concepts of technology and how technology impacts individuals, organizations, corporations, society, and various institutions. There will be focus on current computer technology issues, topics, innovations, utilizations, exploitations, and concerns. Research topics of technological influence with its history, current status, and future implication will be explored. This course will recognize the social, economic, sociological, political, ethical, and psychological effect of computer technology with its uses and misuses. Prerequisites: ENGL120 or equivalent.

COMP 360 Introduction to Networks (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. Prerequisite: COMP241 or computer experience desirable.

COMP 365 Routing and Switching Essentials for Networks (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

Describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both Ic4and IPv6 networks. Prerequisite: COMP360.

COMP 375 Web Page Programming II (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Spring)

This course will involve a comprehensive project that encompasses the knowledge obtained in COMP 270. The project will utilize the students’ knowledge of web page design concepts, HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and JavaScript. The development of this project will require extensive research.

COMP 380 Database Management Systems (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Fall)

This course is a review of file organization and access methods. Examines major database views including relational. Topics of backend machines, query languages, reliability, security and integrity of databases will be covered.

COMP 386 The Wesleyan Journey (1-6 Credit Hours-On Demand)

This course combines service learning with travel, either domestic or abroad, to provide students an opportunity to strengthen values and abilities, in addition to learning specific academic content. The service projects will be linked to the academic content of the class, and the course may require a co-requisite or stand alone as its own special topics course. Credit varies based on the length of the journey and may involve additional fees for travel. Prerequisite: INTD110 is recommended but not required for this course.

COMP 425 Advanced Topics in Computer Science (3 Credit Hours-On Demand)

Topics include fault-tolerate computer systems, Very Large Scale Integration (VSLI), robotics, very large database design, computer performance analysis and other areas of research and class interest. Prerequisite: COMP 410 or consent of instructor.

COMP 431 C++ Programming II (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Spring)

In this course, the student will learn techniques of Object Oriented Programming utilizing advanced concepts in the programming language C++. This widely used language is dominant in the professional world and an in-depth knowledge of it is essential. Prerequisite: COMP 331.

COMP 434 Management Information Systems (3 Credit Hours-Even Year Fall)

This course will investigate information systems issues in the business environment. Up-to- date topics concerning the utilization of computing systems will be discussed. Focus will be given to future developments, security of information, robotics, ethics, Internet.

COMP 455 Server and Network Management (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

This course will introduce the students to multi-user, multi-tasking network operating systems. Characteristics of the Linux, Windows 2000, NT, and XP network operating systems will be discussed. Students will explore a variety of topics including installation procedures, security issues, back up procedures and remote access.

COMP 458 Virtualized Systems (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

This course is designed to teach students how to implement and support virtualization of clients of servers in a networked computing environment. It also explores installation, configuration, and management of computer virtualization workstation and servers. In this course, students will install and configure virtual machine managers, create and network virtual machines and set priorities for accessing resources. Students will move and clone virtual machines and ensure high availability for applications within virtual machines. Students will implement and support virtualization of clients and servers in a networked computing environment. Prerequisite: COMP 360, COMP 365, COMP 463, and COMP 483.

 COMP 460 Internship in Computer Science (2-8 Credit Hours-On Demand)

This course offers an intensive field experience with a community organization. Placement will be based on the student’s career orientation. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and satisfaction of entry criteria where applicable. See Internship under Alternate Means to Academic Credit, for a more detailed description.

 COMP 463 Scaling Networks (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

Describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a large and complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and a switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network. Prerequisite: COMP 360 and COMP 365.

COMP 470 Database Management Systems II (3 Credit Hours-Even Year Spring)

This course builds on the foundations built in COMP 380: Database Management Systems I. It will emphasize object linking and embedding, networking strategies, programming, data access object classes, and other advanced techniques applicable to real world applications. Various relational database systems will be covered, including Microsoft Access and Oracle.

COMP 483 Connecting Networks (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

Discuss the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Student also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSEC and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a comple4x network. Prerequisite: COMP 360, COMP 365, and COMP 463

COMP 485 Special Topics (Variable Credit-On Demand)

A focused investigation into a selected area(s) of Computer Studies that will include topics of current issues in computer studies and related fields.

COMP 490  Independent Study in Computer Studies (Variable Credit-On Demand)

Independent Study consists of research, readings, or other scholarly investigation or creative work. See Independent Study under Alternate Means to Academic Credit, for a more detailed description.

COMP 495 Computer Studies Capstone Project (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

This course will progress into a capstone project for Computer Studies majors. Each student will develop, present and execute a major project. The project must utilize the integration of knowledge obtained through the department’s courses, assignments, and previous projects. The student may choose a concentration of programming; web page design and programming; networking; creating and manipulating robots; implementing databases; and/or an approved topic. Prerequisite: Senior majoring in Computer Information Systems or Computer Science.

COMP 560 Networking Fundamentals (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

The Cisco CCNA Exploration curriculum provides a comprehensive overview of networking; from fundamentals to advanced applications and services. It is based on a top-down approach to networking. This course emphasizes theoretical concepts and practical applications, while providing opportunities for students to gain the skills and hands-on experience needed to design, install, operate, and maintain networks in small-to-medium businesses, as well as enterprise and service provider environments. This course is the first in a sequence of three courses. The goal of this course is to introduce the student to fundamental networking concepts and technologies. The course materials will teach the student to develop the skills necessary to plan and implement small networks across a range of applications.

COMP 585 Special Topics: Computer Technology & Appl. (3 credit-On Demand)

Study of the concepts of information systems and how they affect societies, organizations, and individuals. Focuses on current computer technological issues, topics, and utilizations with their present and future place in health care services, society, and businesses.

COMP 634 Management Information Systems (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

This course concentrates on sampling theory and applications, survey sampling techniques, spatial statistics, inferential statistics, strategy development and optimization; analysis of informational cases within the business organization.

Prerequisite: BUSA 605.

COMP 665 Networking Router Protocols and Concepts (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

The Cisco CCNA Exploration curriculum provides a comprehensive overview of networking; from fundamentals to advanced applications and services. It is based on a top-down approach to networking. This course emphasizes theoretical concepts and practical applications, while providing opportunities for students to gain the skills and hands-on experience needed to design, install, operate, and maintain networks in small-to-medium businesses, as well as enterprise and service provider environments. This course is the second in a sequence of three courses. The goal is to develop an understanding of how a router learns about remote networks and determines the best path to those networks. This course includes both static routing and dynamic routing protocols. Prerequisite: COMP560.

COMP 683 Networking Switching and Wireless (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

The Cisco CCNA Exploration curriculum provides a comprehensive overview of networking; from fundamentals to advanced applications and services. It is based on a top-down approach to networking. This course emphasizes theoretical concepts and practical applications, while providing opportunities for students to gain the skills and hands-on experience needed to design, install, operate, and maintain networks in small-to-medium businesses, as well as enterprise and service provider environments. This course is the third is a sequence of three courses. The goal is to develop an understanding of how switches are interconnected and configured to provide network access to LAN users. This course also teaches how to integrate wireless devices into a LAN and will assist in developing the skills necessary to plan and implement small networks across a range of applications. Prerequisite: COMP360 and COMP365.