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Kansas Wesleyan University

13

Average class size

98%

Placement rate

11:1

Student to faculty ratio

What is Computer Science?

As the foundation for all computing, computer science is defined as “the study of computers and algorithmic processes, including their principles, their hardware and software designs, there [implementation] and their impact on society.”

While this may be a common definition of computer science, education has adapted to accommodate the need for computers and computer skills in all industries around the world.  This has led to many different names for degrees, so it is doubly important to examine a curriculum and find one that matches your personal education and professional goals.

For more information, contact Dr. Annie Hoekman, Associate Professor and chair of the Department of Computer Studies, or call (785) 833-4441.

To meet the other faculty members in the Computer Science Department, click here!

Why a Computer Studies Degree from KWU?

Small Classes

Because of the small class sizes at Kansas Wesleyan, the Computer Studies faculty are able to work closely with students and provide their attention and assistance when it is needed. Our ratio of students to faculty in classes is 11:1, and our average class size is 13. We pride ourselves in knowing students’ names and working with individual students to meet their academic and career goals.

The department is proud to offer current popular programming languages, as well as industry standard network administration and security curriculums on state-of-the-art equipment in dedicated computer labs. The department has a very strong placement rate of graduates into the field or in graduate school upon completion of degrees.

The Community

Our students are surrounded by a strong community at KWU, as well as in Salina.  Students regularly spend time after hours in our labs collaborating on projects and learning from each other, both peers in the classes and students across courses and years. Salina proudly welcomes our students for internships, part-time jobs and professional networking.

Placement

The placement rate after graduation for KWU is 98%. Our students secure jobs in many different sectors that include education in both the public and private sectors, as well as graduate school. Students who are accepted into graduate school have attended both large and small universities and have been successful upon graduation.

Career Opportunities

There are a lot of ways you can use a degree in computers! A student can work solely in the field as a programmer or a network engineer, or you can blend your passions from another area, like business or criminal justice, with computers and make yourself a highly sought-after candidate.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the computing fields are expected to grow by 12 percent from 2018-2028— faster than the average growth rate of all occupations. This projection states the growth will add over 500,000 jobs within the field.

With a major or minor from the Computer Studies Department, you can expect a quality curriculum that is designed for producing graduates that can enter the workforce and be successful upon entry. We also have a number of students who are accepted into graduate school.

Learn more about the KWU Computer Studies department from chair Dr. Annie Hoekman!

About the Computer Studies Program

Mission Statement

The Computer Studies Department functions within Kansas Wesleyan University’s mission which “is to promote and integrate academic excellence, spiritual development, personal well-being, and social responsibility,” while providing a vast array of excellent computer courses, to enhance the student’s education and prepare them for a career in programming, networking, web development, and computer forensics. The Computer Studies Department at Kansas Wesleyan University will challenge the student to develop a robust understanding of computers and their place in today’s society while fostering an ethical attitude with personal and professional development.

Diversity Statement:

“Our department acknowledges, appreciates and honors the fundamental value and dignity of all students and individuals. We strive to provide curricular and cocurricular activities that prepare students from all backgrounds, traditions and experiences to foster respect, understanding and cooperation in an increasingly diverse and global society. “

Program Goals

Students who complete the Bachelor of Science in Computer Studies should be able to:

  • Understand the major areas of computers and their application in today’s society
  • Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills in conjunction with ethical and moral standards
  • Recognize and transfer computer concepts to solve broader societal issues
  • Identify a personal or societal need and then develop, implement and evaluate the technical solution

Software Engineering & Information Management Major Requirements

Core Requirements – 48 Credit Hours

All Software Engineering & Information Management majors are required to complete the following courses:

  • COMP 141 Hardware Organization
  • COMP 165 Operating Systems
  • COMP 221 Foundations of Computing Systems
  • COMP 235 Python Programming
  • COMP 240 Introduction to Linux
  • COMP 270 Web Page Programming
  • COMP 321 Advanced Programming with Visual Basic
  • COMP 333 Software Engineering I
  • COMP 335 Advanced Python Programming
  • COMP 360 Introduction to Networking
  • COMP 365 Network Administration II
  • COMP 380 Database Management Systems I
  • COMP 430 Visual Basic Application
  • COMP 434 Management Information Systems
  • COMP 470 Database Management Systems II
  • COMP 495 Computer Studies Capstone Project

Network Management & System Administration Major Requirements

Core Requirements – 48 Credit Hours

All Network management & system administration majors are required to complete the following courses:

  • COMP 141 Hardware Organization
  • COMP 165 Operating Systems
  • COMP 221 Foundations of Computing Systems
  • COMP 235 Python Programming
  • COMP 240 Introduction to Linux
  • COMP 321 Advanced Programming with Visual Basic
  • COMP 360 Introduction to Networks
  • COMP 365 Networking Administration II
  • COMP 434 Management Information Systems
  • COMP 455 Server and Network Management
  • COMP 458 Virtualized Systems
  • COMP 463 Networking Administration III
  • COMP 483 Connecting Networks
  • COMP 484 Fundamentals of Network Security
  • COMP 495 Computer Studies Capstone Project
  • EMGT 305 Cyberwarfare

Network management & system administration with emphasis in forensic computing major requirements

Core requirements – 48 Credit Hours

All Network management & system administration with emphasis in forensic computing majors are required to complete the following courses:

  • COMP 141 Hardware Organization
  • COMP 165 Operating Systems
  • COMP 221 Foundations of Computing Systems
  • COMP 235 Python Programming
  • COMP 240 Introduction to Linux
  • COMP 305 Foundations of Computer Forensics
  • COMP 335 Advanced Python Programming
  • COMP 360 Introduction to Networks
  • COMP 365 Network Administration II
  • COMP 495 Computer Studies Capstone Project
  • CRIM 200 Criminal Law
  • CRIM 205 Criminal Procedures
  • CRIM 230 Crime & Delinquency
  • CRIM 305 Criminal Investigation
  • EMGT 210 Risk Analysis
  • EMGT 305 Cyberwarfare

Computer Technology Minor

A student seeking a Computer Technology Minor will complete 18 credit hours of any courses with a COMP prefix. The student may only take six credit hours at the 100 level.

Computer Studies Courses Offered

COMP 101 Personal Computing (3 Credit Hours-On Demand)

Personal Computing covers the fundamentals of computer hardware and software for beginning users. The purpose of this course is to give students without previous computer experience the knowledge and skills need to use computers effectively in college and beyond.

COMP 105 Exploring Gadgets (3 Credit Hours- Spring)

This course is aimed at students from all academic majors. No computer background is necessary and none is expected. Students will explore the usage of Raspberry Pi microcomputers and the Arduino microcontroller in controlling interactive gadgets. This course will introduce the student to the fundamentals of controlling real world objects with short, easy to understand computer programs. Elements of electronic design and computer programming will be introduced in the context of simple experiments that will progressively allow the student to become more sophisticated at computer control. Much of the work will consist of controlling lights, motors and toy cars. Students will also explore time lapse photography, both visible and infrared, while utilizing Raspberry Pi programming.

COMP 141 Hardware Organization (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

Hardware Organization covers the fundamentals of computer hardware and software as well as advanced concepts. Students who complete this course will be able to describe the internal components of a computer, assemble a computer system, install an operating system and troubleshoot using system tools and diagnostic software. Students will also be able to connect to the internet and share resources in a network environment. Additional topics included are laptops, portable devices, wireless connectivity, security, safety, environmental issues and communication skills.

COMP 160 3D Design, Digitizing, and Printing (3 Credit Hours- Fall and Spring)

Current Developments and utilizations of 3D Design, Digitizing and Printing will be explored. Parametric modeling software will be utilized to design original work. Additive manufacturing, different printing materials and various 3D printer models will be studied.

COMP 165 Operating Systems (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

In this course, students will develop skills in the management of a desktop client operating system, including how to install and configure network clients, setup users, groups, policies, and profiles, configure hardware components and applications, setup and maintain a logon security and security for files and printers and configure and optimize clients in multiple environments.

COMP 200 Information Management & Data Analysis (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

This course will introduce the students to the fundamentals of data management utilizing an electronic spreadsheet software. Fundamental concepts of electronic spreadsheets will be covered as well as advanced functionality concepts including financial functions, analytical tools, linking worksheets and workbooks and reporting. Students will have the opportunity to apply these skills to real-world scenarios.

COMP 210* Digital Masks (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

In today’s society, a great amount of time is spent in the form of digital expression. A person will work on emails, live physical lives virtually on social media and communicate through physical and digital means. How does this interaction of both real and virtual representation mold physical human beings? This course exposes students to popular social media formats and helps them understand the promises and challenges that social media has brought to each individual’s life. To understand how a person lives physically and digitally impacts how a person will work, live and play each day. This course will help students successfully represent themselves in both areas as well as look at what values and ethics are important to each student and how that impacts people that a student might see physically, but also those individuals we might see or only communicate with digitally. Prerequisite: ENGL120.

COMP 221 Foundations of Computer Systems (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

This course covers the history and present status of computers, computing systems and their applications. The concepts of algorithms, structured programming and event-driven programming for problem solving will be studied. The Visual BASIC programming language with the topics of variables, assignments, conditions, loops, graphical user interfaces, controls and processing scripts are covered.

COMP 235 Python Programming (3 Credit Hours-Fall, Even Years)

This course will cover the basics of programming with Python. The student will learn about expressions, variables, conditionals, loops, lists, sets, dicts, functions, objects and exceptions. Students will build and debug entire programs that demonstrate high-level programming competencies. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to store and manipulate user-input data using Python, implement basic Python decisions and understand iteration, sequence containers, sets and dicts. Students will read and write files using Python, define custom functions and call built-in Python functions, as well as importing modules and namespaces from the python Standard Library. Students will also define classes and instantiate objects using Python’s Class mechanism, handle exceptions and document code and build and debug entire programs written in Python.

COMP 240 Introduction to Linux (3 Credit Hours-Fall, Even Years)

This course is intended for students who want to learn about the Linux operating system. It does not assume any prior knowledge of Linux and is geared toward those interested in systems administration, as well as those who will use or develop programs for Linux systems. The course provides comprehensive coverage of topics related to Linux certifications, including Linux distributions, installation, administration, X-Windows, networking and security. Upon completion of this course, you should have a good working knowledge of Linux from both a graphical and command line perspective.

COMP 270 Web Page Programming I (3 Credit Hours-Fall)

This course provides a study of web page design concepts with emphasis on the theories of HyperText Markup Language and Cascading Style Sheets. The goal of this course is to allow the student to become a sophisticated web page developer, capable of producing attractive and highly functional websites. Additionally, principles of Content Management Systems will be employed to create and maintain web pages with the fundamentals of a popular CMS introduced. The basics of a popular scripting system will be introduced to add additional functionality to the web page design.

COMP 286 Special Topics (Variable Credit-On Demand)

A focused investigation into a selected area(s) of Computer Studies that will include topics of current issues in computer studies and related fields at the lower division level.

COMP 290 Independent Study (Variable Credit-On Demand)

Independent Study consists of research, readings, other scholarly investigation or creative work at the lower division level. See Independent Study under Alternative Means to Academic Credit for a more detailed description.

COMP 305 Foundations of Computer Forensics (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Fall)

This course will provide a foundation in the field of Computer Forensics. The student will learn the recovery and analysis of digital evidence in civil, criminal or administrative cases. Forensic examination techniques of Windows and Linux systems are used to illustrate typical investigative processes. Prerequisite: COMP 141, COMP 164 and COMP 235.

COMP 321 Advanced Programming with Visual Basic (3 Credit Hours-Spring)

The concepts of structured programming and event-driven programming for problem solving will be studied and utilized. The Visual BASIC programming language with the topics of conditions, loops, graphical user interfaces, controls, processing scripts, database management systems, arrays, object classes, subroutines and programmer defined functions are covered. Prerequisite: COMP 221

COMP 333 Software Engineering (3 Credit Hours – Fall, Even Years)

This course utilizes scientific and technological knowledge, methods and experience in the design, implementation, testing and documentation of programs. Structured programming techniques and top-down design will be emphasized. Topics will include data types, string operations, loops, I/O file operations, conditions and logical control structures, data streams, function calls, value and reference parameters, functional decomposition, scope, lifetime, arrays, lists and strings. Prerequisite: COMP321 or COMP235.

COMP 335 Advanced Python Programming (3 Credit Hours – Spring, Odd Years)

The student will learn advanced topics in Python Programming, including lists, dictionaries, list comprehensions and modules. Introduction to the Pandas data analysis library will be a major portion of the course. Iterators, generators and generator expressions with emphasis on working with large data will be included. Functional programming with recursion, decorators and higher-level functions will also be included.

COMP 345* Global Aspects of Technology (3 Credit Hours-Fall and Spring)

The course will provide an analysis of the concepts of technology and how technology impacts individuals, organizations, corporations, society and various other institutions. There will be focus on current computer technology issues, topics, innovations, utilizations, exploitations and concerns. Research topics of technological influence with its history, current status and future implication will be explored. This course will recognize the social, economic, sociological, political, ethical and psychological effect of computer technology with its uses and misuses. Prerequisites: ENGL120 or equivalent.

COMP 360 Introduction to Networks (3 Credit Hours-Fall, Even Years)

This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components and models of the internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches and implement IP addressing schemes. Prerequisite: COMP241 or computer experience desirable.

COMP 365 Routing and Switching Essentials for Networks (3 Credit Hours-Spring, Odd Years)

Describes the architecture, components and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs and inter-VLAN routing in both Ic4and IPv6 networks. Prerequisite: COMP360.

COMP 375 Web Page Programming II (3 Credit Hours-On Demand)

This course will involve a comprehensive project that encompasses the knowledge obtained in COMP 270. The project will utilize the students’ knowledge of web page design concepts, HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and JavaScript. The development of this project will require extensive research.

COMP 380 Database Management Systems (3 Credit Hours-Odd Year Fall)

This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn concepts concerning relational databases. This course will prepare students with skills required to write queries, manipulate data in tables and create database objects.

COMP 425 Advanced Topics in Computer Science (3 Credit Hours-On Demand)

Topics include fault-tolerate computer systems, Very Large-Scale Integration (VSLI), robotics, very large database design, computer performance analysis and other areas of research and class interest. Prerequisite: COMP 410 or consent of instructor.

COMP 430 Visual Basic Application (3 Credit Hours – Fall, Odd Years)

This course will integrate the advanced concepts of programming and the Microsoft Office applications. The course involves writing programs in the Visual Basic language that automates tasks in Microsoft Office applications, in particular Microsoft Excel. Prerequisite: COMP 321

COMP 433 Software Engineering II (3 Credit Hours – On Demand)

This course is concerned with problem analysis, software design, software verification, software validation, software quality and software management. A student will learn techniques utilizing an in-depth knowledge of programming languages while developing and maintaining efficient software systems while satisfying all the requirements of problem solution. Prerequisite: COMP 333.

COMP 434 Management Information Systems (3 Credit Hours-Spring, Even Years)

Topics include fault-tolerate computer systems, Very Large-Scale Integration (VSLI), robotics, very large database design, computer performance analysis and other areas of research and class interest. Prerequisite: COMP 410 or consent of instructor.

COMP 455 Server and Network Management (3 Credit Hours – Fall, Odd Years)

This course will introduce the students to multi-user, multi-tasking network operating systems. Characteristics of the Linux, Windows 2000, NT and XP network operating systems will be discussed. Students will explore a variety of topics including installation procedures, security issues, back up procedures and remote access.

COMP 458 Virtualized Systems (3 Credit Hours-Spring, Even Years)

This course is designed to teach students how to implement and support virtualization of clients of servers in a networked computing environment. It also explores installation, configuration, and management of computer virtualization workstation and servers. In this course, students will install and configure virtual machine managers, create and network virtual machines and set priorities for accessing resources. Students will move and clone virtual machines and ensure high availability for applications within virtual machines. Students will implement and support virtualization of clients and servers in a networked computing environment. Prerequisite: COMP 360, COMP 365, COMP 463 and COMP 483.

COMP 460 Internship in Computer Science (2-8 Credit Hours-On Demand)

This course offers an intensive field experience with a community organization. Placement will be based on the student’s career orientation. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and satisfaction of entry criteria where applicable. See Internship under Alternate Means to Academic Credit for a more detailed description.

COMP 463 Scaling Networks (3 Credit Hours – Fall, Odd Years)

Describes the architecture, components and operations of routers and switches in a large and complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network. Prerequisite: COMP 360 and COMP 365.

COMP 470 Database Management Systems II (3 Credit Hours-Even Year Spring)

This course builds on the foundations built in COMP 380: Database Management Systems I. It will emphasize object linking and embedding, networking strategies, programming, data access object classes and other advanced techniques applicable to real world applications. Various relational database systems will be covered, including Microsoft Access and Oracle.

COMP 483 Connecting Networks (3 Credit Hours-Spring, Even Years)

Discuss the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Student also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSEC and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a comple4x network. Prerequisite: COMP 360, COMP 365 and COMP 463

COMP 484 Fundamentals of Network Security (3 Credit Hours – Spring Odd Years)

This course provides an overview of security administration and fundamentals of designing security architectures. This course will also introduce students to the basics of network firewall hardware and concepts. Topics include networking technologies, TCP/IP concepts, protocols, network traffic analysis, monitoring and security best practices. Upon completion, students should be able to design and implement basic security policies as well as defend common basic network attacks. Prerequisites include: COMP 360, COMP 365, COMP 463 and COMP 483

COMP 485 Special Topics (Variable Credit-On Demand)

A focused investigation into a selected area(s) of Computer Studies that will include topics of current issues in computer studies and related fields.

COMP 490 Independent Study in Computer Studies (Variable Credit-On Demand)

Independent Study consists of research, readings or other scholarly investigation or creative work. See Independent Study under Alternate Means to Academic Credit, for a more detailed description.

COMP 495 Computer Studies Capstone Project (3 Credit Hours-Fall & Spring)

This course will progress into a capstone project for Computer Studies majors. Each student will develop, present and execute a major project. The project must utilize the integration of knowledge obtained through the department’s courses, assignments and previous projects. The student may choose a concentration of programming: web page design and programming, networking, creating and manipulating robots, implementing databases and/or an approved topic. Prerequisite: Senior majoring in Computer Information Systems or Computer Science.

Facilities

The Computer Studies Department is able to teach class in modern computer labs. The lab pictured here is one of the standard computer labs on campus. New computers are rotated into the labs on a four-year cycle. They include software needed for the majors/minors. The classrooms have comfortable seating, Wi-Fi, overhead projectors and printing capabilities.

The department is also home to a state-of-the-art computer lab for the Cisco Networking Academy curriculum. It was remodeled over the winter break of 2018. This lab is now equipped with custom designed computer work tables and chairs. The computers include SD card readers, SSD hard drives, HDMI inputs as well as double monitors that turn horizontally. This space is also self-contained for live networking labs in a safe environment not tied to the campus network.

This classroom was converted a few years ago to house the growing need for the department to teach 3-D printing. The lab is dedicated to printers and two digitizers for both the 3-D Design class as well as general use to the campus. The lab includes Zortrax as well as Makerbot printers. All filament is provided by the department and access to the lab is not prohibited, but is encouraged by the department faculty to be used by anyone with an interest in learning to create and print their own designs.