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Kansas Wesleyan University

Sociology is an exciting and illuminating field of study that analyzes and explains important matters in our personal lives, our communities and the world. Sociology’s subject matter is diverse, ranging from crime to religion, from the family to the state, from the divisions of race and social class to the shared beliefs of a common culture and from social stability to radical change in whole societies. Unifying the study of these diverse subjects of study is sociology’s purpose of understanding how human action and consciousness both shape and are shaped by surrounding cultural and social structures.

At the personal level, sociology investigates the social causes and consequences of such things as romantic love, racial and gender identity, family conflict, deviant behavior, aging and religious faith. At the societal level, sociology examines and explains matters like crime and law, poverty and wealth, prejudice and discrimination, schools and education, business firms, urban community and social movements. At the global level, sociology studies such phenomena as population growth and migration, war and peace and economic development. Sociologists emphasize the careful gathering and analysis of evidence about social life to develop and enrich our understanding of key social processes.

Sociology can also be added as a second major or minor to related fields, such as majors in Criminal Justice, Psychology and Psychological Services and the minor in Political Science.

For more information, contact Dr. Andrew Bedrous, assistant professor of Sociology, or call (785) 833-4359.

Hands-On Learning

Pursuing a degree or a second major or minor in Sociology at KWU makes the field come alive. There are opportunities to conduct research and gain career experience off-campus. Resume-building internships are available at local community-based organizations. Conduct research in an area you’re passionate about. Behavioral Sciences students at KWU get papers published in professional journals, make presentations at academic conferences and help Salina companies and organizations make better decisions.

This program is offered:

  • On Campus

Mission Statement

The mission of the Behavioral Science and Human Services Department is to foster intelligent and compassionate students capable of critical thinking.

The mission of the KWU Sociology program is to nurture future citizens for their role as international, national and community leaders who are equipped to promote meaningful social change, to think critically about social issues and to effectively use scientific data to seek solutions.

Program Goals

Students who complete the Bachelor of Arts in Sociology will be able to:

Demonstrate understanding of sociological theory, social research methodology, comparative and historical-cultural analysis, make effective use of research and data, understand social activism and community involvement.

Sociology Course Offerings

SOCI 108 Cultural Anthropology — 3 Credit Hours (Odd Year Spring)

Cultural Anthropology is the study of man’s adaptation to his natural and social environments. The subfields of ethnology and archaeology will be emphasized, with the major focus given to the developing areas of the world.

SOCI 131 The Sociological Imagination — 3 Credit Hours (Odd Year Fall & Odd Year Spring)

This course will introduce the student to sociology’s basic ideas, research and insights. The topics studied include the major theoretical approaches used in sociology, culture, socialization, stratification, social institutions and social change. Global culture in comparison of American culture.

SOCI 200 Global Demography — 3 Credit Hours (Even Year Spring)

This course offers a multidisciplinary view of the complex and contentious relationships between population, politics, environmental change and economic development. This course is designed so students can use the concepts gleaned to better understand the world and their place in it.

SOCI 240/SOWK 240 Inequity and Stratification —3 Credit Hours (Spring)

This course examines the economic diversity found in the United States, paying particular attention to the three key dimensions of inequality: gender, race and class. The course studies the fundamental sources of inequality as well as the consequences that arise from life in different parts of the inequality structure. Students will be expected to take a critical look at how inequality issues affect their lives, their families and the community around them as well as examine their own and others’ responses to various types of inequality.

SOCI 250 Racial & Ethnic Minorities — 3 Credit Hours (Fall)

This course studies cultural diversity in America. Emphasis will be placed on both the history and present circumstances of all racial/ethnic groups, including white ethnics. It is expected that each student will complete an exhaustive review of their own family history.

SOCI 286 Special Topics – Lower-Level — Variable Credit (On Demand)

This course allows for the study of current topics in sociology and criminal justice best suitable for sophomore level students. The faculty will seek student input in the development of the topics.

SOCI 290 Independent Study — Variable Credit (On Demand)

This course allows for the study of current topics in sociology and criminal justice. The faculty will seek student input in the development of the topics. Possible topics include special offender issues, police operations, urban sociology, social deviance, formal organizations and social problems. See Independent Study under Alternate Means to Academic Credit for a more detailed description.

SOCI 331 Methods of Research — 3 Credit Hours (Fall)

The course surveys the major research designs and their implementation. Some field work will be required. Typically, this course is for students with advanced standing. Computer applications should be anticipated.

SOCI 375 Environmental Sociology — 3 Credit Hours (Odd Year Spring)

This course is designed to be an overview of the major sociological theories, concepts, principles and experiences that shape human-environment interaction. The goal of this course is to provide an understanding of the ways in which human societies have an impact on the natural world, how the natural world affects human societies and individuals, and the ways in which we can understand this relationship. In order to accomplish this goal, we will examine the historical trends and patterns of the consequence of human behavior on the environment and the social response to such information.

SOCI 386 The Wesleyan Journey — 1-6 Credit Hours (On Demand)

This course combines service learning with travel to provide students an opportunity to strengthen values and abilities, in addition to learning specific academic content. The service projects will be linked to the academic content of the class, and the course may require a co-requisite or stand-alone as its own special topics course. Credit varies based on the length of the journey and may involve additional fees for travel. Prerequisite: INTD 110 is recommended but not required for this course.

SOCI 404 Sociological Theory — 3 Credit Hours (Even Year Spring)

This is an advanced course for seniors, which will attempt to integrate and make more coherent the theories, concepts and methodologies of classical and contemporary sociology.

SOCI 460 Internship — 1 — 10 Credit Hours (On Demand)

The student is offered an intensive field experience in a community organization. Placement will be based on the student’s career orientation. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and satisfaction of entry criteria where applicable.

SOCI 485 Special Upper-Level Topics — Variable Credit (On Demand)

This course allows for the study of current topics in sociology and criminal justice. The faculty will seek student input in the development of the topics. Possible topics include special offender issues, police operations, urban sociology, formal organizations, urban planning and demography.

SOCI 490 Independent Study — Variable Credit (On Demand)

This course allows for the study of current topics in sociology and criminal justice. The faculty will seek student input in the development of the topics. Possible topics include special offender issues and police operations. See Independent Study under Alternate Means to Academic Credit for a more detailed description.

Sociology Major and Minor Requirements

Sociology Major

The student must complete all of the following:

BSHS 210 Statistical Analysis – 3

BSHS 210L SPSS Lab – 1

SOCI 131 The Sociological Imagination – 3

SOCI 331 Methods of Research – 3

SOCI 404 Sociological Theory – 3

SOCI 490 Independent Study – 3

or SOC 460 Internship

The student must complete at least three of the following courses:

BSHS 231 Marriage & Family – 3

or BSHS 232 Human Sexuality

SOCI 108 Cultural Anthropology – 3

SOCI 200 Global Demography – 3

SOCI 240 Inequity and Stratification – 3

SOCI 250 Racial & Ethnic Minorities – 3

The student must complete 15 hours of electives from the following:

CRIM 230 Criminology – 3

EMGT 303 Sociology of Disaster – 3

EMGT 306 Social Vulnerability Approach to Disasters – 3

PSYC 201 Social Psychology – 3

PSYC 325 Abnormal Psychology – 3

SOCI/BSHS/CRIM Electives – 15

Sociology Minor

The student must complete:

SOCI 131 The Sociological Imagination

The student must complete 6 hours of electives from the following:

BSHS 231 Marriage and Family – 3

SOCI 108 Cultural Anthropology – 3

SOCI 200 Global Demography – 3
SOCI 240 Inequity and Stratification – 3
SOCI 250 Racial and Ethnic Minorities – 3
SOCI 286 Special Topics – 3
SOCI 290 Independent Study – 3
SOCI 331 Research Methods – 3
SOCI 375 Environmental Sociology – 3
SOCI 404 Sociological Theory – 3
SOCI 460 Internship – Variable
SOCI 485 Special Topics – 3
SOCI 490 Independent Study – 3

The student must complete 9 hours of electives from any of the above or the following:

BSHS 100 Introduction to Political Science – 3

BSHS 105 Foundations of Addiction – 3

BSHS 110 Introduction to Social Work and Human Services – 3

BSHS 200 Public Policy – 3

BSHS 220 Gender – 3

CRIM 230 Criminology – 3

CRIM 235 Juvenile Delinquency – 3

CRIM 325 Crime Analysis – 3

EDUC 244 Developmental Psychology – 3

EDUC 346 Social Studies for Elem Teacher – 3

EMGT 303 Sociology of Disaster – 3

EMGT 304 Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster – 3

EMGT 306 Social Vulnerability Approach to Disaster – 3

PSYC 120 Positive Psychology – 3

PSYC 201 Social Psychology – 3

PSYC 325 Abnormal Psychology – 3
SOWK 140 Social Justice – 3
SOWK 225 Human Behavior and the Social Environment – 3
SOWK 340 Social Welfare Policy Practice – 3